Only a decade or so ago, there was a movement to start building your own furniture again. Farm tables in the kitchen, homemade framed mirrors in the living room, DIY stuff really came back into style.

Unfortunately, that meant everyone was buying up pine, and decorating their house with it. Not to knock the worlds most abundant and cheapest building supply, but come on... It's pine. It works in a pinch for making affordable things, and it distresses really easily when you want that look.

Around 2012, concealment furniture made a splash online. The idea that you could hide things in plain sight around the house made sense. Everything from remote controls to firearms were being stored responsibly, but secretively. It also means people started buying 'rustic' pine furniture again. This created a market, and the price of pine goods shot up like cryptocurrencies do these days.

As YouTube filled with millions of how-to guides for the DIY'er, there were a select few that started thinking "That'd look better in hardwood." And they were right. Fine furniture on such a scale doesn't really exist in America these days. You can shop around most stores, and the 'solid wood' furniture is sold and stated in the academic sense that it's mostly wood, and lots of glue. Chip-board, MDF, fiber-board, etc... Even in the highest price ranges, solid wood furniture is laminated and ply-wood. Perhaps a core of cheap poplar with a veneer of the attractive stuff. Walk through Sam's Club and you'll notice things like that.

Now, even though it's not cheap, makers - AKA - modern craftsmen, are bringing back American made fine furniture. Just look at the video above... Species like walnut, maple, and cherry in just about every unique form. Quilted, flamed, burl, etc... and like you'd expect, it's completely reflected in the final price.

Maybe this trend will spur on a return of classic DIY shows like New Yankee Workshop, or inspire more evolution of YouTube channels currently producing that type of stuff. Either way, it's a good thing.