Flea markets used to be something almost every town had, and they were generally open almost seven days a week. Growing up, my local flea market was in an old abandoned airplane hangar next to the youth soccer fields in my little Mayberry, USA. When my older sisters were playing, my friend and I were welcomed to roam around and find something to do besides watch soccer. Naturally, we found our way into the flea market and proceeded to spend whatever snack money the parents gave us. I'm pretty sure on more than one occasion, the "must have" item was Chinese throwing stars and the occasional pocket knife I was bound to get taken away. Skipping forward to the now, and flea markets just don't exist like the used to, and in seeing this one, that's OK I suppose.

Set about with the weirdest mouthful of a schedule I think I've ever heard, the flea market is alive and well in Canton, Texas. It's give or take about the same distance from Dallas as Lawton is from OKC, but it's enormous. It's not just a little old airplane hangar, it's almost a full square mile of junk and treasures to bestow upon your pile of goodies at home.

Welcome to Canton's First Monday Trade Days.

The name is a little misleading... it doesn't actually take place or start on the first Monday of the month, but rather it begins the Thursday before the first Monday of the month and generally runs through the weekend. There's got to be an easier way to market that, but it's Texas, there's no use trying to reason with 'em. Can you imagine walking through the First Monday Park, 420 acres of stuff offered from some seven thousand vendors? Yeah, sounds like junk heaven to me!

While we've all missed the July event, there's another one coming up. The way the calendar falls, the August First Monday Trade Days will begin September 2nd and run through the 5th. Weird calendar, I know, but it's Texas. You can click the social media post above for more details.

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