As Summer came to a close in August, the question on every mind was "How is school going to work out amid coronavirus?" It was a subject that deeply split opinions among all of us. Will we see schools become super-spreader locations of the virus? Or will schools be able to operate fairly normally for the most part? Of course, everybody had their own opinion of what we should do. Everyone on Facebook magically became epidemiologists and experts in the field of education, teachers pleaded, and the federal government got involved. All in all, as school was set to start back, kids attended as normally as possible. Maybe, since kids seem to be the least affected by this virus, things will turn out OK. That was the positive spin that came out of the debate that sent kids back to school. Fast forward three and a half months, it's still not clear as results aren't consistent across the board.

This morning, Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford announced they would remain in-person through Thanksgiving, but when students are due back after the holiday, the entire school is headed to 100% virtual learning through the rest of the semester. It's probably not because their cases are increasing right now on campus more than they've seen so far, but it's probably a preventative measure to limit the spread as most kids will go home and have their big family Thanksgivings among friends and family. It's honestly not the worst idea in the world. Additionally, the Spring semester won't begin until January 11th, allowing plenty of time after the other big family holidays for students to determine if they've caught the rona or not, but the smart moves don't end there... SWOSU has also announced they will not offer a Spring Break week this year. Which is a bummer, but as those massive destination parties will no-doubt lead to poor health decisions in the dumbest population of adults, the school will make up for it by kicking off Summer Break a week earlier in April.

As SWOSU is almost universally thought of as the best university in the state of Oklahoma, these plans might not be the worst idea for schools across Oklahoma.

I haven't really followed the Lawton Public Schools numbers so far this semester, I don't have a kid in the program here. However, my nephews high school in my hometown has been 100% virtual this month due to the numbers of quarantining students, but they announced a plan to return to in-person learning on November 30th. Wondering if that's going to be a bad move given the big family holiday coming up in a state where the "Chinese virus is just a hoax." Time will tell. I've looked around on the OU and OSU websites, they're still planning in-person at the time I've written this.